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Most Affordable & Effective Deworming Method for your Dog

Posted on January 3, 2011 at 12:05 AM

                        "Most Affordable & Effective  

          Deworming Method for Your Dog."

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I have recently become aware of a very disturbing matter regarding our beloved pets and the dewormers we use to protect them. It seems as though not all dewormers perform the jobs they are described to do. Meaning we are buying and using deworming products that are just not killing the worms they are said to kill. So I am writing this blog to help further educate all of my new puppy parents of the differences in dewormers and let you know which dewormers we can actually count on to get the job done.

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Let's start out with the 5 different types of internal parasites (worms) that our dogs most commonly fall prey to. These include: roundworms, hookworms, heartworms, tapeworms & whipworms. I will briefly describe each worm and its symptoms. If you would like more detail on each worm please see my more detailed blog on internal parasites called "worms in dogs".

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Roundworms (Toxocara canis, Toxascaris leonina)

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There are two types of Roundworms: Toxocara canis and Toxascaris leonina. The Roundworm is the most common type of worm found dogs and puppies. This worm affects the intestines and gives your dog a pot-bellied appearance. Puppies can be infected with these worms even before birth through their mothers uterus and after birth through their mother’s milk. Your dog may also become infected with roundworms through infected soil or even an infected animal. The soil outside your house could easily be contaminated by an infected animal and you not even know it. Once the soil becomes infected it can continue to be infected with roundworm eggs for many years. If your dog ingests this infected soil, the roundworm eggs will begin to hatch in the intestines. These worms will continue to live in your dogs intestines growing to adulthood and eventually producing more eggs.

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These worms can have a spaghetti-like appearance and grow to around 7 inches in length. These worms ARE visible to the naked eye. You may see these worms in your dogs stool or vomit. It is very important to detect and treat an infestation of roundworms early on. If left untreated and allowed to develop, a buildup or "clog" of worms may form in the intestines and form an obstruction. This can result in death. Signs of a severe infestation include: potbellied-appearance, vomiting, diarrhea, weight loss and a dull coat. If your dog is experiencing these symptoms please see your veterinarian immediately.

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For roundworms, puppies should be dewormed starting at 2 weeks of age and every 2 weeks thereafter up to 12 weeks old. Once your puppy reaches 12 weeks it is recommended to deworm on a monthly basis until 6 months old. Once your puppy has reached the 6 month milestone, he is less susceptible to these worms and will only need yearly exams to check for infestation.

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Keep in mind that roundworms can be transmitted to humans and it is very important to promote good hygiene, such as washing your hands regularly. Roundworm eggs are very sticky and can easily adhere to clothing or hands. Remember that your soil outside can be infected with these eggs, so always remember to wash your hands after going out in your yard. You can help reduce the possible spread of these worms by cleaning your dogs stool up from your yard often.

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Hookworms: (Ancylostoma caninium)

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Like Roundworms, Hookworms harbor in the intestines. They are very small, thin worms that hook onto the intestinal wall and suck the blood from their victims. This causes anemia and in some cases death. Hookworms have very sharp teeth that tend to cause bleeding in the intestines. Much like roundworms, these worms live and thrive in the intestines growing to adulthood. They also can be transmitted to puppies through the mothers uterus before birth and through the mothers milk after birth. There is however one key difference between hookworms and roundworms and that is the fact that you cannot see hookworms with the naked eye.

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Hookworms can only be diagnosed by your vet. Signs of a hookworm infestation include: pale gums, bloody stool, anemia, weight loss, diarrhea, and low energy level. A severe infestation may even cause skin irritation. If you think your dog may be infected with hookworms seek veterinarian attention immediately. Hookworms can kill your dog even before the worm is ever detected. ALWAYS keep veterinary exams on schedule and do not skip exams. Your dogs life could depend on it. If you wait for symptoms of an infestation it may be too late.

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Along with roundworms, hookworms too can infect humans. They can be transmitted by penetration of the skin, meaning you could easily become infect by simply walking barefoot across an infected area. Humans infected by hookworms may experience bleeding in the intestines, diarrhea and abdominal pain.

I recommend treating your dog for hookworms on the same schedule as roundworms. Most dewormers that treat roundworms also treat hookworms, making it easy to treat both.

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Tapeworms: (Dpylidium caninum)

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Tapeworms are yet another intestinal parasite and like the roundworm can be seen with the naked eye. These worms are much like their name having a long, flat, tape-like appearance. You may notice broken pieces of this worm in your dogs feces. These broken pieces of worm will have a more rice-like appearance. And even though broken, these pieces of worm can be found still moving and wiggling in stool, around your dogs anal area and even in his bed. Symptoms of tapeworms include: abdominal pain, nervousness, severe itching around the anal area, vomiting and weight loss.

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Your dog can become infected with this worm by ingesting infected fleas. Humans can also be infected with tapeworms but not directly from the dog itself.

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Treatment for this worm cannot be found in your normal over the counter dewormers and normally you must go to your vet for a prescription dewormer. This dewormer can be administered orally or by injection. A dewormer containing praziquantel or epsiprantel is needed.

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Whipworms: (Trichuris vulpis)

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Whipworms are parasites that live in your dogs colon. These worms will attach themselves to the intestinal walls and feed off them causing intestinal bleeding. These little parasites are not visible to the naked eye. Symptoms of whipworms include, weight loss, diarrhea with blood or mucus, anemia and lack of energy level.

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Whipworms are known to be the most difficult worm to eliminate among the worms infecting dogs. There is however effective treatment available. Two treatments are available including febantel and panacur (fenbendazole). Panacur is what most veterinarians will prescribe for effective treatment of whipworms. This treatment will last up to 5 days and then repeated in 3 weeks.

After treatment is finish, consult your vet about recommending a good heartworm medication containing milbemycin oxime as a prophylactic to prevent future re-infestation. Always remember to remove feces from your yard often and clean your yard with a safe cleaning agent. This along with a regular heartworm preventative with help prevent re-infestation. Also don't forget to have your dogs routine exams which include testing your dogs feces every 6 months for intestinal parasites.

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Heartworms: (Dirofilaria immitis)

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Heartworms are parasites affecting your dogs heart. These worms are highly preventable but if contracted can be potentially fatal if left untreated. These worms are spread through mosquitoes that have previously been infected by biting a dog already carrying the disease. Your dog becomes infected by being bit by these infected mosquitoes. These worms destroy the muscle tissue of your dogs heart, which can cause congestive heart failure and result in death. Signs of a heartworm infestation include: coughing, lack of energy, dull coat and even have a pot-bellied appearance.

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Unfortunately, there will be no symptoms of heartworm disease until it has progressed to an advanced stage. This is why it is very important to start your dog on a heartworm preventative at an early age. Your dog should have his first heartworm test between the ages of 6-9 months. A good heartworm preventative such as Heartguard or Heartguard Plus for Cats & Dogs will be prescribed.

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Deworming Options

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Now that we've covered the basics of internal parasites, it's time to talk about the best dewormers to use for your dog or puppy. Some of you may rely on your vet to prescribe you the best dewormer and some may be buying your dewormers from your local pharmacy or pet supply store. Now either way, you CAN get a good effective dewormer. But what most don't know is that some OTC (over the counter) dewormers are not very effective at all. I myself have fallen victim to being deceived by OTC dewormers. As you all know I breed beautiful bouncing baby Boston & Min Pins and in my profession use dewormers quite frequently. We breeders follow guidelines and rules to raising happy healthy puppies and one is deworming our babies at 2, 3, 4, 6 & 8 weeks of age even if there is no sign of worm infestations. Now I have been doing this with all my puppies and never had an issue (until now) with my OTC dewormer. It was only until we got a new puppy that happened to be infected with three types of worms that I realized how ineffective my OTC dewormer actually was.

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I have been raising worm free puppies for years now and had never had a problem with my dewormer until some of my puppies got infected with the 3 types of worms the new puppy had. Now the dewormer I had always been faithfully using should have killed at least two types of these worms, which were roundworms and hookworms. Well unfortunately it didn't. This cause for concern prompted me to call my vet and bring up a question I had never had the need to ask before.... "Why is my OTC dewormer not working?"

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It turns out that most OTC dewormers are very ineffective. Most don't kill the worms they are said to easily rid your pet of. In fact it turns out the dewormer that should kill roundworms and hookworms usually only kills’ roundworms and sometimes doesn't even do that effectively. Now I find this very disturbing. Lots of dog owners put their faith and their dogs health in the hands of OTC dewormers and have no idea how useless some really are. But don't worry because you do have other options.

For those of you who want the best but don't want to be charged that high cost of a vet exam, there is a solution. Most vets are very easy to work with and will help you if you will just call them. If you call your vet and simply tell them you need a good dewormer and give them the details they will in most cases make you up a bottle or order of tablets of prescription dewormer with syringes for you to come and pick up. Yes, all you have to do is pick it up. No vet exam and no vet bill for a prescription dewormer. All you pay is the cost of the dewormer. Your vet may give you a tablet known as Drontel Plus or maybe some liquid Panacur. Either of these dewormers are very effective and well worth the money. Drontel Plus kills roundworms, hookworms, whipworms & even tapeworms and should range anywhere from $3.99 up to $17.99 per tablet. Drontel Plus can only be used on puppies 3 weeks of age or older. Panacur another great dewormer killing roundworms, hookworms, tapeworms & whipworms should cost around $15 for a 2ML bottle. Panacur is even safe to use in pregnant dogs. So this is a great option for dog and puppy owners who sometimes cannot afford an expensive vet exam.

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Now, for those of you with quite a few dogs or for breeders who need a lot of good quality dewormer for their dogs, there is a very inexpensive alternative to these high costing dewormers. We've already established we cannot put our trust into most of the OTC dewormers that only kill two types of worms...that is if we're lucky. So here's what we need. A good dewormer that kills many types of worms and with the same quality as a prescription dewormer at only a fraction of the cost. And most may think that there is just nothing like that out there, especially at a fraction of the cost. But with much research I have finally came across a very, very powerful dewormer that kills just as many and more types of worms than Drontal Plus or Panacur that is very inexpensive. This product is called Ivomec. Ivomec (Ivermectin) is widely used by many vets and breeders. Most people however have never heard of this product. The reason being, it's actually made for use in cattle and swine. And before you judge this product you should do some research and see how many vets, breeders and dog owners actually have great success using Ivomec. Ivomec is used not only for internal parasites but for external parasites as well. This product in only one single dose kills more types of internal and external parasites than any other product with its long lasting power. The efficiency of Ivomec against internal and external parasite control has been demonstrated around the world.

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Ivomec is known to control the following parasites:

*Hookworms

*Gastrointestinal Roundworms

*Heartworms

*Whipworms

*Lung Worms

*Sucking Lice

*Sarcoptic & Psoroptic Mange Mites

*Dictyocaulus viviparas

*Brown Stomache Worms

*Ear Mites

*Fleas

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Ivomec takes care of pretty much everything EXCEPT TAPEWORMS. For Tapeworms you will need a separate dewormer. I recommend checking your local Tractor Supply. They do have the Tapeworm dewormer tablets there at a great price. I personally use EquiMax for treatment of Tape Worms. EquiMax is a horse paste and labeled for use in only horses, but lots of breeders and dog owners use it. EquiMax has Ivomectin already in it and takes care of everything Ivomec does plus kills tape Worms in a single dose. It is very inexpensive at less than $12 a tube. If you can't find what you're looking for at your local Feed & Supply store you can always call your vet and they will give you the tablets you need (without an exam!)

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Here are the correct dosing procedures:

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*Please keep in mind that if you use a diluted solution the dosing would be different....I do not know the correct dosing amounts for a diluted dose of Ivomec. If I were going to dilute the Ivomec I would measure out the correct dose of straight Ivomec first and then just add some milk to it.

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Ivomec Injection for Cattle & Swine 1% Solution dosage is 1/10 cc per 10 lbs. of dog weight.

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Warnings & Precautions

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ALWAYS make sure you use the correct dosage amount when using Ivomec. You can overdose your dog if given too much. Here are the adverse effects straight from the Handbook of Small Animal Practice.

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Adverse Drug Reactions:

Ivermectin: Anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea, depression, ataxia, and seizures."

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The above is widely excepted published material used by veterinarians all over the country.

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Also in my research of this product I have found that Ivomec SHOULD NEVER BE USED in Collies, Sight hounds and other herding breeds. Also do not use it in Merle dogs. More info on why you should not use Ivomec in these dogs can be found easily online.

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If you have any other concerns or worries with using Ivomec on your dogs you can also do your research like I have and decide for yourself if you want to use it or not. I know it says on the box of Ivomec that is specifically for Cattle & Swine and to not give to dogs, but what some may not realize is that Ivomec is a product given to dogs quite often by their vets. Ivomec is the active ingredient in Heartworm preventatives. For example: Heartguard contains .272 cc of Ivermectin (Ivomec) for 50-100lb. dogs.

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Now you see you do have options when it comes to what dewormers you use. So no matter what budget you’re on you will be able to safely and effectively care for your beloved doggie.

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If you have any other questions concerning Ivomec feel free to email or call me and I'd be happy to answer any questions I can to help you out. :)

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Categories: Most Effective & Affordable Deworming Methods

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56 Comments

Reply shirley
3:36 PM on April 5, 2014 
what is the dose of the equimax for dogs? i have a schnoodle and just can't get rid of her worms. so this is something I am going to try.
thanks
Reply Doris
8:19 AM on November 6, 2013 
I have seen no sign of worms in my puppy. From 3 to8 wks I dewormed her wth Sergeants sure shot 2x. OCT. MY FUR BABY is a 4 pd chi. Pappilion. If I don't SEE any signs should I still deepen. I am on AS income. So can I afford the Ivomec? She seems very healthy. Plus I only let her on porch never yard. She has only been around 2 dogs. Thanku
Reply Peggy
3:38 PM on September 28, 2013 
can i use Ivomec on Rottweiler
Reply Angel
8:04 PM on August 21, 2013 
How about the dossage for equimax paste and tablets to be use on dogs. Is it also possible to deworm puppies using equimax?
Reply Julie & Rusty Sloan
1:26 AM on April 21, 2013 
Thanks for saving me a ton of money. We have 6 SIX small (under 20#)
dogs, and even the over the counter stuff from Petco was going to be $72.00
Reply justice
10:34 PM on April 15, 2013 
I have a 6 week blue nose pitbull puppy he has never been given an kind of worm medicine until today i gave him a small dossage amount of sergeants vetscripition worm away 7 it works on tape worms roundworms and hookworms by tonight i seen worms in his stool i wanted to know if it was safe to also give him the deworming shot at.the local vet when i first got him i thpught he was just fat then i realized he had the appearence as if he had roundworms so i gave him the dewormer pills an he did have worms in hid stool what elsecan i do to help my puppy
Reply Anthony
10:18 PM on March 13, 2013 
Can you use ivomec on puppys 2 weeks old and what would be the correct dose,
can you use ivomec on puppys this jung age
I breed profesionally and i found information on this site about ivomec.
I use panacure but its quite expencive any help would be great thanks
Same info on equimax would be great to thanks
Reply Courtney
12:42 AM on March 10, 2013 
I don't have a question about Ivomec, it's actually about Drontel Plus. I rescued an 8 month old pitbull from a shelter last month, and today he vomited up a roundworm. Do you think it's wise to still make a vet appointment? Or is it safe to just go straight to over the counter Drontel Plus? I'm a college student and trying to find the most affordable solution. Thanks so much.
Reply marilyn
8:36 PM on March 6, 2013 
Julie says...
I find your research very interesting. I worm my horse with Equimax so I have this on hand. I have a rescue dog. His breeding is Shepard/black lab/Border collie. He currently weighs 74 lbs. is Equimax safe for him and if yes what would the dosage be? Do you know if this wormer would be safe for cats?

Thanks,
Julie
Reply J m
6:58 PM on March 6, 2013 
What happens if you are using safe guard and you accidentally gave dose 2 and 3 in the same day. My husband and I over lapped. Will my dog be ok and will it work.
Reply Jm
6:55 PM on March 6, 2013 
Lisa says...
If you are using the safe-guard canine dewormer powder that you give in a three day dosage...you can do a follow up deworming in as little as one week. But I would recommend & most vets recommend waiting 3 weeks. What you're waiting for is the eggs that the first deworming couldn't kill to hatch out. You want to do the follow up deworming when the worms have hatched but before they are old enough to lay their own eggs, as dewormers only kill adult worms.
Reply Brenda
9:54 PM on March 2, 2013 
Thank you for your information, it has been very helpful to me. Regarding the EquiMax for the tapeworms, do you know the dosage per lb? Also, do you know of a product OTC that works on coccodia on puppies?

Thanks,
Brenda
Reply Paria
10:25 PM on February 23, 2013 
Hi again
I have two 3-year old dogs that are a mix of german shepherd and golden lab. Can I give them ivomec?
How often should i deworm my dogs using ivomec?
Thanks,
Paria
Reply karen kathleen mercado
7:34 AM on February 4, 2013 
hello!my dog has a blood and worms on her stool...should i tret the blood first before the worms?
Reply Gabriel
7:40 PM on January 16, 2013 
How often should I deworm my dogs using the Equimax paste?

Thanks
Reply April Sikes
5:51 PM on January 1, 2013 
I saw your email on a site where I was searching for ideas to help 2 of my dogs. We live in the country on 15 acres, and of course adopt and help dogs of all kinds that are "dropped off." (We currently have six) My problem now is that we have a new stray (Ben) that appears to be some kind of a really large lab-mix --- he is obviously miserable with ear mites of some kind because he constantly shakes and scratches his ears. I bought over the counter ear mite treatment, but he won't let me anywhere close to putting it into his ears. Ben is also very thin, and I don't know if he has some sort of worms? We can't get him to load into the truck to take to the vet, so I was looking for some sort of treatment I could do myself. My other concern is my old Border Collie (Jack) who is 17 years old - his ears have always been bad, as has his skin (itchy like allergies), and I was looking for some relief for him. I am going to buy the Equimax for Horses, but I don't know how much to dose? Is it the same as the Ivomec? Thanks for helping me!! Happy New Year - April
Reply maggie
7:07 PM on December 7, 2012 
Thank you for your blog and interest in helping parents take care of thier babies properly :) I rescued two dogs from an owner who could not give them the attention and love they require and deserve. Turned out to be one of my biggest blessings in life!! Sassy is a cockapoo and Rocky is a minpin/chihuahua. My Father passed away last week, therefore they did not get the attention they typically get from me. After my Dads funeral Saturday, my attention is turned back toward home. I noticed Rocky(my little stinker), didn't seem himself. Was not excited for walks, lack of interest in playing. I thought maybe because I had been distraught and inattentive, he was just sad or upset with me. Well, on our morning walk, after his poop, I bent down to pick up, I noticed two pieces of "rice" on it. I knew almost immediately it had to be a worm. They were not moving, but then I noticed one barely moving. I was devestated. They are up to date on shots, but not being a seasoned dog owner, this is all new to me. I have been reseaching and concluded they are tape worm, based on description. I am so upset for him. I stumbled accross your blog, and bought the Eqimax at Tractor Supply. Because I have not treated them before for ANY worms EVER, I am thinking they should be fully treated. I went back and read all of your replies to posts and I know the .125ml for a 12 lb. dog. I guess I am looking for reassurance this is okay to give them. I would be absolutely LOST without my best friends. Especially with losing my Father, that is also the reason I cannot afford a vet bill at this time. They are both adult dogs. Rocky is about 10 lbs. I will weigh them and dose accordingly. Any advise would be greatly appreciated regarding the worms, and if I am okay doing this. Thanks a bunch!!!!
Reply Julie
11:56 AM on November 19, 2012 
I find your research very interesting. I worm my horse with Equimax so I have this on hand. I have a rescue dog. His breeding is Shepard/black lab/Border collie. He currently weighs 74 lbs. is Equimax safe for him and if yes what would the dosage be? Do you know if this wormer would be safe for cats?

Thanks,
Julie
Reply Lauren
4:08 AM on October 16, 2012 
Hello! I currently have a 5 month old puppy who I believe to have round worms. He had his routine worming treatment from his previous owner and I got him about a month and a half ago. My question is he didn't have worms until he had been here for a about a week or so and since them I have given him 2 tablets (1 every 2 weeks) and a tablespoon and a half of evict DS, so why does he still have worms in his poop and in his bed? I am hesitant to take him to the vet as I am in a new area and don't know who the good ones are but at the same time I don't want to overdose my puppy. Do you have any advise?
Reply susan lennox
3:21 PM on October 13, 2012 
for the last 2 years I have wondered "where are the worms in the poop?" . Thankyou for this insight. the OTC definitely is not working